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(SALT LAKE CITY, Utah) — Seventeen years after he arrived in the United States, Faafo'i Laulu Ah Chee of Fa'aala, Palauli, Savai'i is living his American dream.

On April 11, 2018 at a U.S. federal courthouse on South West Temple Street in downtown Salt Lake City, Ah Chee became a U.S. Citizen.

(FRESNO, Calif.)-On Nov. 20 and 21, 2014, President Barack Obama announced the administration's "Immigration Accountability Executive Action." The plan that the President outlined is designed to help reform the immigration system and ranges from measures to enhance border security, to new temporary protections for many of the people living in the United States without permission. Many of these changes, will directly affect members of the Pacific Islander community. With this blog, I will highlight the two most pertinent changes.

US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) officially announced the process for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients to renew their status. If you have DACA, here are the things you need to know for your renewal:

(1) The form is still I-821D, but it is a NEW version and there is NO grace period between the old form and the new one. This means that any forms sent in beginning today (June 5, 2014) must be on the updated form or else they will be rejected as improperly filed.

Here is a common scenario with respect to immigration issues in the Pacific Islander community: You arrived in the United States many years ago on a tourist (B1/B2) visa. You were supposed to return to your country of origin within 6 months, however, you chose to remain in the US past the expiration of your visa. You NOW have a US Citizen Spouse, child (over 21), or parent (if you are under 21), who can petition for you to become a lawful permanent resident (green card holder).

(Ta'iala) In the past few months, I have hosted several immigration seminars, workshops and informational booths in both California and Utah, targeting the Pacific Islander community.  During these public venues, four key things stood out to me as issues that NEED to be addressed in the Polynesian community with regard to immigration. 
 

(Honolulu, HAWAI'I)--Leo o Tumua ma Pule, a newly formed group of Samoa citizens living in Hawai’i will celebrate Samoa Independence Day Saturday, June 1 with a flag raising ceremony 8:30 a.m. at the Kuhio Park Terrace Community Resource Center in Kalihi.

A.S. CONGRESSMAN: “E lē falala fua le niu”

(Washington D.C.)—Congressman Faleomavaega Eni Hunkin represented American Samoa and the nation’s Pacific Islanders when he spoke to members of Congress and hundreds of community leaders of Asian and Pacific descent at a meeting in Washington D.C. last week.

In addition to a Chinese proverb, Faleomavaega also used a Samoan proverb to address immigration reform at the gathering, according to a press statement issued by the congressman’s office.

By Leah L. Tuisavalalo, Pasifika Immigration Law Group

(Fresno, CALIF.)--On March 4, 2013, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS or "Immigration") began accepting applications under a program that reduces the time U.S. citizens are separated from their immediate relatives (spouse, children and parents), who are in the process of obtaining visas to become lawful permanent residents of the United States under certain circumstances.